Help Kids to Learn at Home

help Kids to learn

HELP KIDS LEARN AT HOME

Learning doesn’t just happen in classrooms; it is an ongoing process that happens all the time (your brain even keeps working when you’re asleep). There are tons of fun ways to help children learn when they’re not in school.

Evenings, weekends, holidays—they all offer families great opportunities to spend time together, have fun, and continue learning

If you want your child to be a stellar student, don't limit learning to the walls of his classroom. Although the skills he's learning there are crucial to his intellectual and social growth, your child needs your help to open up the world of ideas. His renewed joy in discovery will transfer to his schoolwork, so you'll boost his academic achievement too!

1 Fill your child's world with reading. Take turns reading with your older child, or establish a family reading time when everyone reads her own book. Demonstrate how important reading is to you by filling your home with printed materials: novels, newspapers, even posters and placemats with words on them.

2 Encourage him to express his opinion- talks about his feelings, and make choices. He can pick out a side dish to go with dinner and select his own extracurricular activities. Ask for his input on family decisions, and show that you value it.

3 GET COOKING -Children love to feel like little helpers, so why not let them help with grocery shopping or cooking meals? The great thing about these activities is that they help with an integral (and often difficult) school subject: math.

Have your child decide which produce is a better bargain, or ask them to measure ingredients. Not only will they quickly learn that math is useful, but you also get to eat what you make!

Here are some kid-friendly recipes for everyone to enjoy:

5 GET OUTSIDE-Fresh air is not to be underestimated! The outdoors provides a natural playground for children to learn and grow, not to mention exercise helps keep the body and brain fit.

Go on a walk around the block; hike in a nearby Conservation Area; go swimming at a public pool. You don’t even have to leave the house – plant a vegetable garden together, build a snow fort, or play basketball in the driveway. Regardless of the activity, getting outside means kids spend less time in front of screens, and that helps keep their bodies and minds active.

6 Show enthusiasm for your child's interests and encourage her to explore subjects that fascinate her. If she's a horse nut, offer her stories about riding or challenge her to find five facts about horses in the encyclopedia.

7 Provide him with play opportunities that support different kinds of learning styles — from listening and visual learning to sorting and sequencing. Supplies that encourage open-ended play, such as blocks, will develop your child’s creative expression and problem-solving skills as he builds. He'll need lots of unstructured play time to explore them. 

8 Point out the new things you learn with enthusiasm. Discuss the different ways you find new information, whether you're looking for gardening tips on the Internet or taking a night class in American literature.

 

9 Ask about what he's learning in school, not about his grades or test scores. Have him teach you what he learned in school today — putting the lesson into his own words will help him retain what he learned.

 

10 Help your child organize her school papers and assignments so she feels in control of her work. If her task seems too daunting, she'll spend more time worrying than learning. Check in with her regularly to make sure she's not feeling overloaded.

 

11 Help your child organize her school papers and assignments so she feels in control of her work. If her task seems too daunting, she'll spend more time worrying than learning. Check in with her regularly to make sure she's not feeling overloaded.

 

12 Help your child organize her school papers and assignments so she feels in control of her work. If her task seems too daunting, she'll spend more time worrying than learning. Check in with her regularly to make sure she's not feeling overloaded.

 

13 Celebrate achievements, no matter how small. Completing a book report calls for a special treat; finishing a book allows your child an hour of video games. You'll offer positive reinforcement that will inspire him to keep learning and challenging himself.

 

14 Celebrate achievements, no matter how small. Completing a book report calls for a special treat; finishing a book allows your child an hour of video games. You'll offer positive reinforcement that will inspire him to keep learning and challenging himself.

 

15 Focus on strengths, encouraging developing talents. Even if she didn't ace her math test, she may have written a good poem in English class. In addition to a workbook for math practice, give her a writing journal.

 

 

 

 

 

  • by- Sandeep Verma
  • WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2017
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